PCN Editor

24 April 2017

How much do freelance copywriters charge in 2017?

Exploring the day rate findings from the ProCopywriters Survey

What are freelance copywriters charging – right now?

538 copywriters responded to our copywriting survey, giving us a fascinating snapshot of the copywriting profession, including the rates that people charge.

The average day rate charged is £339 – just £2 more than our 2016 survey result.

How typical are these rates?

While £339 is the average day rate charged by our survey respondents, there is a huge range of rates charged for a day of copywriting, with some people charging just £100 – and others charging £1800. So while the average is £339, how many people are actually charging that sort of rate?

Here is a breakdown of the number of copywriters charging in each price bracket:

  • £1000 – £1800 per day: 5
  • £900 – £999 per day: 1
  • £800 – £899 per day: 4
  • £700 – £799 per day: 7
  • £600 – £699 per day: 21
  • £500 – £599 per day: 24
  • £400 – £499 per day: 53
  • £300 – £399 per day: 131
  • £200 – £299 per day: 122
  • £100 – £199 per day: 42

This gives a better picture of the distribution of day rates across our respondents. As you can see, very few people are charging more than £700 per day. The greatest concentration is in the £200 – £400 price range.

Our survey also shows that average day rates vary according to locations – although you don’t have to live in London to charge a reasonable rate for your work.

How do our findings compare to your own experiences? Do you find these results encouraging – or depressing? Are your rates comparable to your peers – or are you planning to change what you charge?

If you want to write about our survey results, you can grab all the graphs and charts on the PCN Flickr page.


What do you think?

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Charlotte Fleming

April 25, 2017 at 10:34am

I wonder how much the rate varies across Scotland – between, say, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen, or between the cities and the sticks. We may only have some 6m people, but as a region it’s just as diverse as England! (I realise you probably didn’t have enough respondents to make any sort of significant statistical analysis; it’s just a passing thought.)